The Colorado Freedom Force
Action. Together.

In years ending in an odd number, Colorado’s ballot initiatives are limited to topics concerning taxes or state fiscal matters arising under TABOR.
That is why the number of ballot questions is smaller and less diverse than we had in 2020, and what we will see in 2022.
Below are the recommendations from the Colorado Freedom Force regarding statewide ballot measures.

2021 Colorado
Voter’s Guide

From The Colorado Freedom Force

Amendment 78:

VOTE

"YES"

Amendment 78 would move the decision making related to appropriating “custodial money” to the State Legislature.

We believe the Legislature should be responsible for deciding where these funds are spent, which include funds such as Federal COVID “stimulus” money.

This adds more transparency to funding decisions, as well as increases potential for citizen engagement in the process.

The only negative is these custodial funds do not fall under the fiscal restraints of TABOR, but Colorado Freedom Force recommends a “YES” vote nonetheless.

Proposition 119, otherwise known as “LEAP” will increase taxes by $137.6M  annually on the retail sales of marijuana products, 

Those funds would be loosely designated to out-of-school learning programs, but Prop 119 gets a “NO” recommendation for two important reasons:

1) It creates an unelected (and therefore unaccountable) authority board with 9 members selected by the governor and allowed to choose their successors.

2) This is clearly a “sin tax”, and opting to tax a product at a higher rate because you may not consume it or agree with it is a dangerous, slippery slope which you could regret in the future.

Proposition 119:

VOTE

"NO"

Proposition 120:

VOTE

"YES"

Proposition 120 will reduce property tax rates for multi-family and lodging properties in Colorado. Originally, this measure sought to lower residential and non-residential property taxes, but the State Legislature undercut the measure shortly after it qualified for the ballot (SB21-293).

Colorado home values are rising rapidly alongside the basic cost of living in the state, and this effort will help to partially offset the property tax increases resulting from real estate price increases.

Colorado is still searching for the ideal replacement to the Gallagher Amendment which was repealed last year. Proposition is not that solution, but its a (small) step in the right direction.

Amendment 78:

VOTE     "YES"

Amendment 78 would move the decision making related to appropriating “custodial money” to the State Legislature.

We believe the Legislature should be responsible for deciding where these funds are spent, which include funds such as Federal COVID “stimulus” money.

This adds more transparency to funding decisions, as well as increases potential for citizen engagement in the process.

The only negative is these custodial funds do not fall under the fiscal restraints of TABOR, but Colorado Freedom Force recommends a “YES” vote nonetheless.

Proposition 119:

VOTE    "NO"

Proposition 119, otherwise known as “LEAP” will increase taxes by $137.6M  annually on the retail sales of marijuana products, 

Those funds would be loosely designated to out-of-school learning programs, but Prop 119 gets a “NO” recommendation for two important reasons:

1) It creates an unelected (and therefore unaccountable) authority board with 9 members selected by the governor and allowed to choose their successors.

2) This is clearly a “sin tax”, and opting to tax a product at a higher rate because you may not consume it or agree with it is a dangerous, slippery slope which you could regret in the future.

Proposition 120:

VOTE    "YES"

Proposition 120 will reduce property tax rates for multi-family and lodging properties in Colorado. Originally, this measure sought to lower residential and non-residential property taxes, but the State Legislature undercut the measure shortly after it qualified for the ballot (SB21-293).

Colorado home values are rising rapidly alongside the basic cost of living in the state, and this effort will help to partially offset the property tax increases resulting from real estate price increases.

Colorado is still searching for the ideal replacement to the Gallagher Amendment which was repealed last year. Proposition is not that solution, but its a (small) step in the right direction.